We may want to ask ourselves how “the proclamation of the word” works in Acts 2:32-33, 37-47, and how the listeners’ response to that proclamation constitutes worship. And then, what kind of further worship that first worship leads to. That is: what counts as worship in this story? Because we seem to be looking at a description of a way of life centered around … worship. And it seems to make the people who are living that way profoundly happy.

We are studying this text for Sunday, September 26 – boldly reading that infamous “banned book,” the Bible. [Some notes on the text are here.] Here are a couple more questions we might want to ponder, or even discuss in class:

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What is the Holy Spirit doing in this text? Where is the Holy Spirit named explicitly, and where do we think the Holy Spirit is actively at work, even though not explicitly mentioned in the text? Why do we think this?

[More personal] Does the Holy Spirit behave the same way today, in our experience? What makes us say this?

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In what way or ways does the Christian community we’re familiar with resemble the community described in these verses? In what way or ways does it not?

[More personal] How do we feel about that? What, if anything, do we think we might need to do about that? That is, us personally? Why?

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Would we call the life of this early community “worship”? Why, or why not? What do we think of as “worship”?

If we were to think of “all of life” as an arena for worship, what would change in our lives, do we think? What would we like about that? What would we not like? Why, do we think?

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two women in antique dress reading

Image: “Reading,” Alexander Moravov, 1913, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons